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Sports

The Indians Cannot Be Stopped

Anyone that has watched the Cleveland Indians lately knows one thing: history is being made. The Indians have won 22 straight games, breaking the 2002 Oakland Athletics’ American League record of 20 consecutive wins. The Indians have been on fire, scoring 137 runs during their streak while holding their opponents to a dismal 34 runs, and everyone has been pitching in.

While the Indians’ ace Corey Kluber is proving he deserves the Cy Young Award, there is a different Indians pitcher that has been masterful during this streak: Mike Clevinger, who pitched 18 consecutive scoreless innings and has allowed just a .159 batting average to opposing batters. Pitcher Carlos Carrasco has also been on a tear, allowing just a .062 ERA and throwing 34 strikeouts in his four starts since August 24. During the strike, Carrasco also eclipsed the 200 strikeout mark for the season, an elite mark that few pitchers reach.

Offensively, just about everyone has been contributing. During the streak, despite missing four games, third baseman Jose Ramirez has posted a batting average of .383 and has hit 8 home runs. Shortstop Francisco Lindor has been just as impressive. During the streak, Lindor raised his batting average by 11 points and slugged 9 home runs, reaching the 30 home run mark for the first time in his young but very promising career.

What could be most impressive about this streak more than anything else is not who has been contributing, but who hasn’t. During the streak the Indians have been without All-Stars Andrew Miller, Jason Kipnis, and Michael Brantley. In their place, younger guys like Tyler Olson, Bradley Zimmer, and Greg Allen have been making the most of the opportunities that have been given to them.

Let’s be honest: the streak can’t last forever. But there is one thing that is for sure: if the Indians continue to pitch and hit at the level that they currently are, they will be unstoppable in October, and Cleveland may end up celebrating like it’s 1948.

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