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Opinion

Abortion: Pro-Life or Pro-Choice?

About half of all pregnancies among women in the United States in 2011 were unintended, and about four in ten of these were terminated by abortion. In 2014, one in twenty women will have had an abortion by the age of twenty.

Only 1% of abortions are because of rape. The majority reason for abortion, at 25 percent, is because the woman is not ready for a child.

Abortion is one of the toughest topics to talk about as there are many people who have strong opinions. With both “pro-life” and “pro-choice” groups standing firm on their opinions, it is difficult to have a civilized conversation without sparking a disagreement.

The pro-choice movement is a sociopolitical movement in the United States supporting the view that a woman should have the legal right to an abortion. Pro-choice groups defend their decision saying that the risk of death associated with child-birth is 10 times higher than that associated with abortion.

The pro-life movement supports many organizations such as the National Abortion Federation, which is an organization of abortion providers. They have extended outside of the United States into Canada and Australia, as well as many European countries and Mexico.

The pro-life moment is an anti-abortion movement that believes that all humans, including the unborn, have a right to life. They believe that if a woman chooses to have an abortion, then she is murdering a child. Pro-life groups defend their opinions by educating people on the medical facts of the matter.

The child’s heart beats 21 days after conception. The heart beat is only audible after 8-12 weeks. Most women have abortions from 7-12 weeks, in which the baby has already started developing a nose, mouth, ears, brain waves and even hiccups.

Both the pro-choice and pro-life movements have valid opinions, and neither group has to agree with the other. What we need to work on is coming together as a society to be able to sit down and have a civilized conversation without beating each other down for their opinion.

 

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