‘The Post’ Review

The Post Review

Max Boland

Over the weekend, my aspiring journalist father (a pilot, musician, former lawyer, physician’s assistant, hippie and anthropologist among other things) took me to see ‘The Post’, a film about the release of Top Secret documents by the Washington Post. Now, let me just start off by saying, my father isn’t impressed by much — he’s seen the world, all the good and bad, and nothing much takes him off guard. This movie, however, was accompanied by so many gasps I couldn’t recognize him in the dark.

Meryl Streep plays the owner of small-time magazine The Washington Post, Katherine Graham, after her husband and heir of the magazine dies — leaving her a widow. The New York Times is being tried in court for releasing government secrets during the Nixon administration, when The Washington Post gets a hold of the entire 4,000 page study of the Vietnam War done by the government. The decision must be made — release the entire Top Secret study and face jail time and serious government blowback, or deny their journalistic integrity for the sake of stock prices and keeping the Post afloat. To avoid a serious spoiler, I’ll stop here.

The movie was shot and directed by Steven Spielberg and is a must see for any journalist, future politician or anybody who values truth. The aesthetics alone and strong female lead of Streep, as well as it all being based on a true story, show the audience both the inner workings of a newspaper and moral dilemmas when a story faces the public.

The Post also features Ben Bradlee, Sarah Paulson and Tom Hanks among many other esteemed actors and actresses. If my critical father can enjoy the honesty, integrity and aesthetics of the film, so will your date or parent.