Midterm election results– and what they mean

Riley Geyer

On November 6th, the midterm elections for the US House, Senate, and Governorship occurred.

Until now, both the House of Representatives and the Senate were Republican dominated houses, but the results of this election flipped the House. The Senate, however, is actually more dominated by Republicans than it was before the election.

Both parties are inclined to say that they won. Republicans- living in fear after the 2016 election for the oncoming “blue wave”- were relieved at the simple flip of the House. But Democrats call this a small victory.

Lakewood High School senior Sara Bitter wasn’t shocked at the results. “I predicted every Ohio victory and loss.” she said.┬áLocal results were accurately predicted before the election by most sources. All incumbents were chosen for positions of District 9 Representative, Governor, and Senate.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine won his race for reelection against Democrat Richard Cordray. The results were close, with DeWine having only a 3% lead over the popular vote. Richard Cordray and DeWine frequently butted heads over social issues, like black lives matter.

Marcy Kaptur, representative for Ohio’s 9th district, ran for reelection against Steve Kraus. According to the ToledoBlade, “Miss Kaptur, 72, has been representative in the U.S. House since 1983 and this year became the longest-serving woman in the House after 35 years in office.” Kraus lost to Kaptur but a whopping 34% of the popular vote.

Member of the United States Senate, Sherrod Brown, won his race for reelection against Republican challenger Jim Renacci. Brown is known as a moderate Democrat, and his win against Renacci is a big step towards a Democratic midwest.