The “COVID Fatigue” Is A Main Contribute To Ohio’s New Spark In Cases

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Sylvie Ballou

As Cuyahoga County entered the red zone, the so much-awaited and desired return to school has once again been postponed.

There have been several factors that contributed to this spike in cases: large schools that went back to in-person school had to shut down again because of an increase in cases, as the weather gets colder the virus is more mobile and strong, and most importantly, people have been relaxed about sticking to the rules of the pandemic.

As we all already know so well, the average citizen’s duty is to wear a mask in public, stay six feet apart from people who aren’t consistently in their lives, and limit social gatherings to as little people as possible (ten is ideal).  These precautions have been prioritized by fewer and fewer people as the pandemic has gone on. Those who have not been personally infected or know someone who has been infected are beginning to leave it up to chance.

Junior Ellie Humphreys, who works at Mitchell’s, has noticed that “customers will come in with their masks on incorrectly or not at all even though Mitchell’s can get pretty crowded.” This is not a very uncommon situation.

When I go on a walk through Lakewood, I only pass, at the most, three other people wearing a mass, but I will pass a total of 30 to 50 people.

That is the reason we can’t go back to school — because so many people don’t want to deal with these inconveniences in their lives.

So even if you personally have not been affected by this virus, you need to continue to take every safety precaution possible to protect others who could be more vulnerable.