What is going on in China?

What+is+going+on+in+China%3F

Johana Guci

We all observed the Coronavirus having its major outbreak in January 2020, but a month has already passed, and things have already started to adjust. What is going on in China? Are things changing for the better, or for the worse?

According to the New York Times, more than ten percent of China’s population is under lockdown. At least 150 million people are stuck living inside the four walls of their homes and under government restrictions on how often they can go outside. Half of the country’s population is forced to follow strict rules on who can enter or leave a certain community. 

But the strictness can vary. Some neighborhoods require residents only to show their ID, sign in and have their temperature checked when they enter. Others prohibit residents from bringing guests. In places with harsher policies, only one person from each household is allowed to leave home at a time. In the city of Xi’an, the authorities are allowing residents to leave their homes only once every three days to shop, and that may not take longer than two hours. 

Sammi Zhang, a senior at Lakewood High School, has many relatives who live in China and are experiencing the terrifying situation there.

“My aunts and uncles live in Shanghai and they wear N95 masks all the time. They are advised not to go out so now they work from home. Schools are closed and deliveries are being postponed. However, more people are getting recovered than diagnosed, so that’s a good thing. The Chinese experts are saying that the disease’s turning point has already arrived, so soon we should see a downward sloping of the curve and that they’re rushing to develop a cure. Also, new hospitals are being built to admit more patients, so the situation is not entirely hopeless,” she says.

Just like Sammi said, on Wednesday, the number of confirmed new cases in China appeared to be slowing down. Even though the country’s total number of reported infections has reached 74,185, there have not been as many newly infected individuals as there once were.